Monday word of the week – Passementerie

Definition of PASSEMENTERIE

: an ornamental edging or trimming (as tassels) made of braid, cord, gimp, beading, or metallic thread

Origin of PASSEMENTERIE

French, from passement ornamental braid, from passer

First Known Use: 1794

 

I saw the word Passementerie in an on-line article about embellishments. Of course I love embellishments, so found the word interesting. I don’t think I have ever heard it before, or at least I didn’t pay attention to it.

Wikipedia has lots of info about it, not to mention a few more new words to learn. :)

Passementerie

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Passementerie or passementarie is the art of making elaborate trimmings or edgings (in French, passements) of applied braid, gold or silver cord, embroidery, colored silk, or beads for clothing or furnishing.

Styles of passementerie include the tassel and fringe  (applied, as opposed to integral), ornamental cords, galloons, pompons, rosettes, and gimps as other forms. Tassels, pompons, and rosettes are point ornaments, and the others are linear ornaments.


Passementerie worked in white linen
 thread is the origin of bobbin lace and passement is an early French word for lace.

Today, passementerie is used with clothing, such as the gold braid on military dress uniforms, and for decorating couture clothing and wedding gowns. They are also used in furniture trimming and some lampshades, draperies, fringes and tassels.

History

Orna118-Quasten.png

In the West, tassels were originally a series of windings of thread or string around a suspending string until the desired curvature was attained. Decades later, turned wooden moulds, which were either covered in simple wrappings or much more elaborate coverings called “satinings”, were used. This involved an intricate binding of bands of filament silk vertically around the mould by means of an internal “lacing” in the bore of the mould. A tassel is primarily an ornament, and was at first the casual termination of a cord to prevent unraveling with a knot. As time went on, various peoples developed variations on this.

In the 16th century, the Guild of Passementiers was created in France. In France practitioners of the art were called “passementiers”, and an  apprenticeship of seven years was required to become a master in one of the subdivisions of the guild.

The French widely exported their very artistic work, and at such low prices that no other nation developed a mature “trimmings” industry. Tassels and their associated forms changed style throughout the years, from the small and casual of Renaisssance designs, through the medium sizes and more staid designs of the Empire period, and to the Victorian Era with the largest and most elaborate.

Passementerie with clothing was for a long time reserved for the elites as a sign of social distinction among royalty, aristocracy, religious, and military. Since the 18th century, the use became obsolete with the simplification of clothing.

Some of the historic designs are returning today from European and American artisans.

Thanks to Wikipedia for such great information.

So how will you use this week’s word – passementerie?

~Deb~

About these ads

About Deb Prewitt

I am an aspiring artist. I love all things creative and enjoy the people around me who are artistic. I live in Colorado which is a great place to be. I enjoy lots of different things and plan on exploring those things in this blog.
This entry was posted in Monday word of the week and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Monday word of the week – Passementerie

  1. In my language, this word is used also for the shops that sell trims, buttons, thread and all kind of bits and pieces that are used in sewing, knitting, crochet and needlework. My favorite shops. :)

  2. Pingback: Passementerie | Lizbeth's Garden

  3. Carmelo Mack says:

    In the West , tassels were originally a series of windings of thread or string around a suspending string until the desired curvature was attained. Decades later, turned wooden moulds, which were either covered in simple wrappings or much more elaborate coverings called “satinings”, were used. This involved an intricate binding of bands of filament silk vertically around the mould by means of an internal “lacing” in the bore of the mould.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s